Yashar Ali, born on November 23, 1979, is an American journalist. Because of his extensive Twitter reach, Ali was named in Time Magazine’s List of the Most Influential People on the Internet in 2019.

Ali was born in Chicago to an Iranian family. He was born in Oak Park in Illinois and attended Holy Cross High School at River Grove. Later, Ali moved to Los Angeles and worked as a television production assistant for shows such as Chicago Hope.

Curious to know Yashar Ali Weight Loss journey?

Let’s start.

Yashar Ali Weight Loss

Once in one of His blogs, He Discussed weight loss Journeys in a very different way. Here we will tell you all his experiences on the weight loss journey and what he recommended to people.

In his blog, he said:

It’s the most natural reaction when we see someone visibly losing weight, whether a friend, colleague, or family member. We say, “You’ve lost some weight!” You look great!”

These statements are often made with the best intentions. We want to express our genuine gratitude to that person and show that we appreciate their sacrifices and hard work. However, I would like to make a controversial statement: We all must consider praising or acknowledging someone’s weight loss.

Why?

Yashar Ali Weight Loss Story We don’t always understand why someone has lost the weight we commend them for. My friend Anna, who has Lupus, lost 30 pounds in just a few months. Anna constantly received positive affirmations about her appearance and was encouraged to continue the excellent work. Anna decided to keep her diagnosis secret (to most people) for various reasons.

She was forced to choose between two worlds. One in which she had the to disclose why she was losing weight, and one where she could smile and bear it. Anna stated, “Every time I heard those words, it was like getting a punch in my stomach.” It made me feel ashamed of my body and put me in a place where I wanted people to understand my diagnosis.

Also, Yashar Ali shared the story of her cousin’s weight loss journey. He said that:

My cousin’s professor was faced with a similar problem after she lost a significant amount of weight during summer break. The same affirmations were given to her. She didn’t know that her mother had passed away a few weeks earlier. Stress was the reason for her weight loss.

These two women received effusive praise and smiles that were directly opposed to the pain that led to their weight loss.

Even if someone isn’t facing an uncontrollable situation like a death in a family or a terminal illness, we don’t know how they get to their weight loss.

Yashar Ali gives some more suggestions about weight loss:

Sometimes, and maybe more often than we realize, weight loss can signify an eating disorder or a poor body image. Complementing someone who has lost weight due to one of these conditions only fuels the flame. The National Eating Disorders Association reports that ten million people are affected by anorexia or bulimia. Millions more people may secretly suffer from one of these disorders, as bulimia and other food-related illnesses lend themselves to hiding.

Yashar Ali Weight Loss Transformation

When we publicly and actively praise someone’s weight loss, especially young girls/women, are we praising someone for a healthy lifestyle or someone in a severe mental health crisis? Is it wrong to encourage someone to continue losing weight? If not, this could lead to their untimely death.

I don’t mean someone who has a medical diagnosis. The media constantly exposes women to a barrage of incredibly unhealthy body images. Even if they aren’t binging, purging, or starving, it doesn’t mean that they don’t need the same discipline from us regarding their weight loss.

Even if we think we are aware, even though we never really are, we can still be unaware that someone we know is attempting to lose weight in a healthy and balanced manner. The way we praise them can cause more pain in an already painful process.

It’s almost rude not to mention someone’s weight loss. We often assume that people have shed the weight and the past pain. This is usually a mistaken assumption.

Yashar Ali shares the weight loss journey of his friend Jane:

Jane, a friend of mine, was 35 and decided to lose weight due to her family history of heart disease. Over eight months, she lost 65 pounds. She was stunned at the response she received from people to her weight loss.

One of my good friends (a man) kept commenting on her beauty. He would exclaim, “You are so beautiful,” in an animated tone.

“These words were the first I had ever heard from him. Did I think I was a disgusting pig? “Now I’m worthy of being validated.”

Others were effusive with their praises in a condescending manner. Jane often heard, “You’re doing such a great job!” You are doing a great job! She would listen to this constantly, even though the person was staring directly at her stomach and smiling.

It makes me feel like shit, and although I know they have good intentions, it’s almost like I was a child. You can now control your behavior; you are an adult. Bravo!

After two years of regular exercise and a change in diet, Ally lost 100 pounds. Family members commented, “Oooooh, now you have to go out and get a boyfriend.”

How could Ally think that her weight loss was linked to acceptance by those who love her and believe she is worthy?

While I don’t think we should not compliment someone for being attractive, I am not in the position to tell people what they need. Positive attention and vocal support can benefit some people who have lost weight. We need to be careful about making statements to someone new or comments suggesting that weight loss makes them more competent and legitimate.

It’s related to our belief that they are now worthy of being average or that we accept them as usual. People who lose weight are likely to have shed their mental and emotional baggage. They don’t usually have.

Ally was also subject to the attention she didn’t want. One family friend shouted across the room: “Oh my God, look at me!”

Everyone turned around and saw her immediately. Ally, who struggled for years with insecurity and felt shame and deep pain about her body and weight, was suddenly made to feel like an unrepentant circus freak.

She said, “I just want my life to go on without being reminded of how gross I was to others.”

This is contrary to what we have been taught.

While I don’t think many people want encouragement and attention, they indeed do. It’s dangerous to use this strategy and the praise we’re taught to give to all people. We shouldn’t assume that weight loss can be made in one size fits all. We may never know the truth about what is behind this weight loss.

Yashar Ali after weight loss

Yashar Ali Weight Loss Transformation, Before and After

It’s related to our belief that they are now worthy of being average or that we accept them as usual. People who lose weight are likely to have shed their mental and emotional baggage. They don’t usually have.

Ally was also subject to the attention she didn’t want. One family friend shouted across the room: “Oh my God, look at me!”

Everyone turned around and saw her immediately. Ally, who struggled for years with insecurity and felt shame and deep pain about her body and weight, was suddenly made to feel like an unrepentant circus freak.

She said, “I just want my life to go on without being reminded of how gross I was to others.”

This is contrary to what we have been taught.

While I don’t think many people want encouragement and attention, they indeed do. It’s dangerous to use this strategy and the praise we’re taught to give to all people. We shouldn’t assume that weight loss can be made in one size fits all. We may never know the truth about what is behind this weight loss.

Ask yourself if this person has invited you into their private moment or if they have engaged in a conversation about it. Most of the time, the answer to this question is “no.”

When do we say things like “You’re beautiful,” even though we’ve never told them to someone before? What happens if they fall into a relapse? What happens if they gain weight again, as many people do? How can they think they won’t be attractive if we add the word “beautiful” to their new body? Is it possible to be beautiful if they have a thinner body?

Victoria, my friend, lost significant weight by exercising and dieting. After a few months without seeing her, I was shocked at her transformation. I was tempted to praise and compliment her, but then I looked at her body. But I didn’t. I hugged her and said that I loved her. Although it was awkward for me not to talk about her weight loss, I wanted to be open to the possibility that she would like to move on. The thinner Victoria is no different from the woman I love.

She doesn’t deserve to feel this way.

Yashar Ali Weight Loss Before and After

Yashar Ali Diet Plan for Weight Loss

So, We think that Yashar Ali’s point of view about weight loss journeys is valid and heart-touching; what do you think about it? Share your opinions in the comment session.

Also, Yashar Ali shared a tweet about weight loss that went viral.

He said that crying could help you lose weight. The best time to cry is between 7 pm and 10 pm.

He shared the Blog Post From https://worldofbuzz.com/study-crying-can-help-you-lose-weight-the-best-time-to-cry-is-from-7pm-to-10pm/.

That is what The writer of that blog post would like to explain.

You can lose weight if you love watching sad movies and crying often. This is what the study suggests.

It has been revealed that emotional crying can lead to weight loss. This happens because you hold onto emotions you don’t want. All those feelings you usually suppress and keep in your head!

William Frey, a biochemist, discovered the ability to remove toxic substances from the body through stress-induced tears.

It’s also impossible for our bodies to store more fat after we shed those tears. This excretory process would have already released all the stress hormones that were suppressed.

However, this study found that these benefits can only be realized if real emotions trigger your tears. FYI, there is a difference between the following types of tears:

Basal tears, also known as “basic functional tears,” keep our peepers hydrated.

Reflex tears, also known as “irritation tears,” are tears that we shed involuntarily due to environmental stressors such as smoke or wind.

Psychic tears, also known as tears, are connected to our genuine emotions and feelings.

According to this theory, the only way to lose weight is by letting your psychic tears stream down your face. It seems that there is a time limit to maximize this effect. Scientists have suggested crying between 7 and 10 pm, as this is when you can call over your favorite rom-com or films with sad endings. I think I’ll make a note of when I can Netflix and cry.

A good cry seems to help us release all our negative emotions for our mental health and physical well-being. Take this study with a grain of salt, and don’t cry every day because you want to lose weight.

Sources & References

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